Ms. Gokturk

Foundations

ACT I

SCENE I.

A desert place.

 

1.       What will their costumes look like?  Who are they?

2.       How will they move on stage? In parentheses, add stage directions.

3.       How should they read their lines? In parentheses, add stage directions.

 

Thunder and lightning. Enter three characters.

 

First

When shall we three meet again
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

Second

When the hurlyburly's[1] done,
When the battle's lost and won.

Third

That will be ere the set of sun.

First

Where the place?

Second

Upon the heath[2].

Third

There to meet with Macbeth.

First

I come, Graymalkin[3]!

Second

Paddock[4] calls.

Third

Anon[5].

ALL

Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
Hover through the fog and filthy air.[6]

Exeunt



[1] commotion

[2] Barren patch of land

[3] Affectionate name for gray cat

[4] toad

[5] Immediately

[6] Trochaic Tetrameter is a rapid meter of poetry consisting of four feet of trochees. A trochee is made up of one stressed syllable followed by one unstressed syllable (the opposite of an iamb). Here is the flow of a line of trochaic tetrameter: BAboom / BAboom / BAboom / BAboom. Although iambic pentameter is the primary meter used in Shakespeare's plays and poems, you will find many lines of trochaic tetrameter. Shakespeare's sonnets are written predominantly in a meter called iambic pentameter, a rhyme scheme in which each sonnet line consists of ten syllables. The syllables are divided into five pairs called iambs or iambic feet. An iamb is a metrical unit made up of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable. An example of an iamb would be good BYE. A line of iambic pentameter flows like this:  baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM.