Ms.  Gokturk                                                                           Due JANUARY 10th

Mythology

 

The Mythology Final Project

 

THE SITUATION: You have already completed more than half of an introductory mythology course.  You have a number of mythological stories swimming around in your head, and it is about to explode.  You can’t help but notice the universality of mythology.  You need an outlet! Just like Aeschylus and Euripides used the stories as the driving force of their plays, you want to interpret one of the ancient stories, for your own purpose.

 

YOUR TASK: Choose one of the options below to “re-tell” one myth/tale [unless otherwise indicated] we read this semester.  Your retelling should have the goal of revealing a truth about the world.  The final project will consist of two elements: a written component and a presentation component.  All of your text will be submitted to turnitin.com by January 10th.

 

GUIDELINES: Your retelling should deliberately present a specific message.  You choose to retell a myth to illustrate a truth about the world or human nature.  For instance, in Prometheus Bound, the theme of rebellion versus tyranny is developed.  The individual voice does have the power to stand up against what is wrong.  In The Bacchae, the conflict of opposing forces is developed.  It becomes obvious that inflexibility causes more problems than are needed.  In Till We Have Faces, the theme of atonement is developed.  Humans err because of jealousy and envy, but ultimately they can be forgiven for their sins if they are truly remorseful.  In other words, your retelling should use a story to illustrate a philosophy or belief you have about your.  You are the author and you have a message! Pick a theme!

 


Myths to be Retold

Greek Creation (Creation, Titans vs.  Olympians, Olympian Gods)

Prometheus (Creation of Man, Punishment)

Lesser Gods

Dionysus – his birth, religion, descent to the underworld

Demeter/Persephone/Hades story

Orpheus and Eurydice

Jason and Medea

Pyramus and Thisbe

Echo and Narcissus

Adonis and Aphrodite

Ceyx and Alcyone

Cupid and Psyche

Causes of the Trojan War

Odysseus’ four great adventures

Theseus

Perseus

Hercules

King Midas

 

Fairy Tales to be Retold

The Maiden without Hands

Little Red Riding Hood

Cinderella

Rumpelstiltskin


Phaeton

 

 

The Project Options

 

Movie.  Write a script that follows the proper format for a screen play (you can find examples on the Internet) and film a movie short.  Requirements:

 

Theater.  Perhaps you want to write your own tragedy or parody… Requirements:

 

Poetry or Song Portfolio.  Write 10 songs/poems that analyze a myth (or several myths) from a thematic interpretation and/or varying points of view.  For each song/poem, be sure to include a paragraph explication (minimum) that connects what you wrote to the myth/tale using specifics.  The portfolio should resemble a literary journal, a magazine, or CD liner notes.  Make sure there is a cover.  *Extra credit will be given to the songwriter who can compose the music to accompany the lyrics. 

 

The Mythology Soundtrack: Make a six song CD that will serve as a soundtrack for the course.  Your liner notes will ultimately be the parts of an essay in which you explain why you are including each of the songs on the mix.   For each song or musical piece:

 

Mythology Newspaper or Magazine: Create a newspaper for the mythological world.  Using a desk top publishing program, you will make your articles look like a major publication [you will choose a publication to emulate in presentation – this means you will need graphics!].  You may write about as many of the myths as you would like, but you must have 5 articles that are different:

 

The different news writing styles can be found in any newspaper, but if you need help, Ms.  G will instruct you on how to do it. 

 

Graphic Novel / Comic Book: Recreate the story in a graphic novel (i.e., comic book) format.  Choose the most important scenes - in your view - and retell the myth [see The Sandman version of Orpheus].  The quality of your project will be determined by the following:

 

Mythological Character’s Life, Later: Write a piece of short fiction in which you join a character’s ten (or more) years after the story ends.  Write a first person account from this perspective of the after-math of this character’s life.  Be sure to reference and use details from the myth.  Refer back using flashbacks or reoccurring imagery, and create a thematic interpretation of the myth.  Be sure to have a clear setting and conflict to help develop your theme.  Requirements:

 

Mythology Board Game: Turn a myth (or combine myths) into a game! No cheap rip-offs, please.  Be sure to include:

 

Mythology "Scrapbook": Compile a scrapbook of memorabilia from a character’s perspective.  For instance, if it were Hera’s scrapbook, you might include a peacock feather and a cow print patch.  All artifacts must be captioned with an explanation:  you must reference the significance of the item to the character.   This project will be assessed based on the amount of memorabilia collected and its presentation.  As a benchmark, expect to get at least ten pieces of memorabilia for your scrapbook.  Each item should have at least one very well developed paragraph explaining its significance.   

 

Archaeological Dig: You have discovered a site that holds artifacts that force us to reconsider the myth. Identify, log, photograph the artifacts and explain what they reveal. For instance, the Golden Apple, as it turns out, did not say. “To the Fairest, “ but it said, “_______.” All artifacts must be captioned with an explanation:  you must reference the significance of the item to the myth.   This project will be assessed based on the amount of artifacts collected and its presentation.  As a benchmark, expect to get at least ten pieces.  Each item should have at least one very well developed paragraph explaining its significance.   You are rewriting the myth around the objects.

 

Children’s Book.  Write an illustrated children’s book that re-tells a myth and delivers an educational moral to children.  Provide an Introduction and/or Afterword that serves as the analysis and rationale.  It should detail what you attempted to do, how you did it, and a self-assessment.  Your introduction should demonstrate real thought and analysis while the story illustrates creativity and style.  You will also need to break up the narrative with illustrations, just as children’s books do.

 

Visual Arts Mythology Portfolio.   Create a photo documentary to thematically represent one or more of the stories.  If you are using more than one myth, please make sure that you cover a variety.  [*You may also choose a different visual medium.  If painting, collage, or drawing is your thing, go for it!].   All pieces must be captioned with a paragraph that explains it, its significance, and incorporate specifics from the tale to support your theory.  Provide an introduction/rationale that demonstrates real thought and analysis about what you were trying to emphasize in your visual interpretation. The thematic elements you tried to capture should be outlined in this introduction. 

 

This option is for the artistic student. As a benchmark, expect to create at least 10 visual interpretations.  All visuals must be original art or photography. 

 

Archetypes in Mythology.   Write a research paper on Jung’s archetypal theory and apply it to the works we read this semester.  Your paper will need to present the theory in your own words and then dissect the myths.  Use MLA citing, please.

 

Experimental Thinking: The Metaphorical Project.  Choose one object and analyze its parts through a myth.  Examine how the sums of its parts work together (or against each other) just like the characters you read about.  The object could be big or small, but your analysis should be logical and fit.  Requirements:

 

Critical Essay.  Write a critical essay that develops an interesting thesis to serve as a base for analyzing a series of myths.  You might, for example, examine how usurpation and male power appear in various myths.  Or, how humans are cruelly treated by the gods in stories.   Trace a pattern or find an interesting point of analysis.

 

OTHER IDEAS? Propose an idea that you are passionate about!

 


This project will be worth:

 

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What will be graded and how?

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